Recent Articles

Rivermont returning to Bettendorf plan commission with a modified classroom/dorm building proposal

Rivermont Collegiate officials are returning to the Bettendorf Planning and Zoning Commission today (2/21) with a slightly modified plan to build a 4-story classroom and dormitory building.

This time, however, the private school won't need to seek a land use change or rezoning to accommodate the expansion.

City planners now say the building is an "accessory use" for the property, which doesn't necessitate either a land use change or rezoning of the property.

Facing a projected $912,000 budget deficit in coming year, Bettendorf officials recommend 10% increase in residential property taxes

Calling it a "perfect storm" that created a $912,000 projected budget shortfall, Bettendorf city officials are recommending the council hike property taxes 10 percent in the coming year, plus increase stormwater fees 8.5 percent, sewer fees 7 percent and solid waste fees 5 percent.

The increase in property tax would mean the average resident with a home assessed at $215,000 would pay approximately $147 more annually. The higher sewer, stormwater and solid waste fees for an average user of those services would see an approximate annual increase of $31.

Sports complex owner wants extra large sign to make sure motorists will see from interstate

The sports complex being built at Forest Grove and Middle Roads is asking the Bettendorf Board of Adjustment to approve an extra large sign so motorists won't miss it as they whiz by on Interstate 80.

The sports facility – initially known as the Bettplex and recently renamed TBK Bank Sports Complex – wants a sign nearly four times larger than the permitted 300 square feet.

The city's board of adjustment will consider the request for a variance to permit the 1,146 square foot sign at its Thursday (2/8) meeting.

Bettendorf school plans could require hefty increase in tax levy; expiration of 1-cent school sales tax may require seeking voter approval of bond issues

The substantial and controversial Bettendorf school district plan to spend more than $62-million for a second new elementary school and district-wide building improvements could require hefty increases in property taxes for homeowners, particularly if the state 1-cent sales tax for schools isn't renewed soon by the state legislature.

The school district has identified dozens of building projects, including construction of a new $14-million three-section elementary school that would be needed if Jefferson and Mark Twain Elementary Schools are closed.

Lee Enterprises reports earnings increase thanks to $19.7 boost from one-time income tax adjustment

Lee Enterprises – owner of the Quad City Times and Dispatch-Argus newspapers – today (2/1) reported higher net income and earnings for the first quarter ended Dec. 24, thanks primarily to a $19.7-million income tax adjustment stemming from the recently passed federal tax reform legislation.

The Davenport-based media company reported net income for the first quarter of $35.3 million with $19.7 million of that total coming from a one-time adjustment to its deferred tax assets and liabilities to reflect the lowering of the federal base tax rate from 35 to 21 percent.

Use of Edgewood Park for new Bettendorf elementary school would require approval by National Park Service and Iowa DNR

The city owned Edgewood Park along 23rd Street has been the leading location for a new three-section elementary if the district decides to close Mark Twain and Jefferson schools.

But using part or all of the 7-acre park for a school will require more than approval by the city and school board.

That's because the city has used federal Land & Water Conservation Funds (LWCF) funds for development of the park, and converting it to school use will require approval of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) and the National Park Service.

Bettendorf officials scramble to plug $1.3 million budget shortfall; early retirement incentives, property tax increase under consideration

A projected $1.3-million budget shortfall has Bettendorf city officials scrambling to offer an early retirement incentive to employees and seeking council support for a property tax increase for the coming fiscal year.

City Administrator Decker Ploehn and Mayor Bob Gallagher called a special work session of the city council Monday (1/29) to outline the proposed early retirement program and the need for higher taxes to offset the incentives over the short term.

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